GREAT CINEMATOGRAPHERS


#1: From interview [1999]

#2: [Right] with dir Steven Spielberg [1980]

 

   


DOUGLAS SLOCOMBE

 

Born: 10 February 1913, London, UK, as son of journalist/writer George Slocombe.

Died: 22 February 2016, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Chelsea, London. UK.

Education: Paris, France.

Career: Was raised in France, but returned to the UK in 1933. Became freelance journalist and ph in England, Poland and Holland [Amsterdam] [1933-39]. The footage he shot in Poland and Amsterdam was used in Herbert Kline's doc 'Lights Out in Europe'. During WWII he ph war footage for Alberto Cavalcanti ['Went the Day Well?'] and Ealing Studios. After the war he became a doph at Ealing Studios.

Ph commercials dir by Cliff Owen, a.o.

Was member [now honorary member] of the BSC. Was awarded the Order of the British Empire [OBE] in 2008.

Appearances: 'The Making of 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'' [1981, Phillip Schuman; doc/60m], 'Made in Ealing - The Story of Ealing Studios' [1986; doc for BBC-tv series 'Omnibus'], 'Behind the Camera' [1999; dir/ph: Richard Blanshard; 13m; for BBC-tv], 'Forever Ealing' [2002, Andrew Snell; ph: John Howarth; doc/50m], 'The Making of 'The Italian Job'' [2003, Matthew Field & Lancelot Narayan; ph: John Hazell; doc/70m], 'Indiana Jones: Making the Trilogy' [2003, Laurent Bouzereau; ph: Ron Siegel, a.o.; doc/127m] & 'Mackendrick on Film' [2004, Paul Cronin; ph: Gavin Syevens; educational project/400m].

Awards: BSC Award [1963] & BAFTA Film Award [1964] for 'The Servant'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1965] for 'Guns at Batasi'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1967] for 'The Blue Max'; BSC Award [1968] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1969] for 'The Lion in Winter'; BSC Award [1973] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1974] for 'Jesus Christ Superstar'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1972] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1974] for 'Travels with My Aunt'; BSC Award [1974] & BAFTA Film Award [1975] for 'The Great Gatsby'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1976] for 'Rollerball'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1977], LAFCA Award [1977], BSC Award [1978] & BAFTA Film Award [1979] for 'Julia'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1982] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1982] for 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'; BSC Award nom [1984] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1985] for 'Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom'; BSC Lifetime Achievement Award [1995]; ASC International Award [2002].



GO TO FILMS

Alec Guinness [left/leaning] - Stanley Holloway [pointing] - Charles Crichton - DS [right]

"The Lavender Hill Mob" [1951]

 

Many of the great cinematographers are identifiable by a signature style, whether it be painterly lighting effects or a penchant for epic vistas. Brit lenser Douglas Slocombe is an exception - the features he shot are united only in their adaptive commitment to finding each project's ideal visual language. From his work on nearly all the classic Ealing comedies through a sustained collaboration with Steven Spielberg, Slocombe's camera has been chameleonic. But its brilliance has seldom gone unnoticed. Slocombe remains charmingly modest about his contribution to the art form. Reached by phone at his London home, he looks back on having addressed "a great variety of pictures... each time on a completely different level. A lot of cameramen try to evolve a technique and then apply that to everything. But I suffer from a bad memory and could never remember how I'd done something before, so I could always approach something afresh. I found I was able to change techniques on picture after picture."

Period pieces, intimate psychological studies, exotic adventure tales and romantic comedies are just a few of the genres accommodated in an oeuvre that reinvented itself yet again in a final career lap lensing all three of Spielberg's cliffhanging 'Indiana Jones' films. That flexible mastery was fostered during 17 years of employment at England's legendary Ealing Studios, where Slocombe became the pre-eminent house cinematographer. "Ealing was rather like Hollywood in the old days," Slocombe recalls. "It had a number of cameramen and directors and writers under contract, so there was a continuity of production. We all knew each other so well, we'd spent the eves together in the local pub. It was very much a community."

After Ealing's demise in the late 1950s, Slocombe freelanced for different companies, at one point signing a three-year contract with 20th Century Fox that resulted in a series of CinemaScope spectaculars, from the seafaring adventure of 'A High Wind in Jamaica' to the high flying of WWI-set biplane saga 'The Blue Max' and the African intrigue of 'Guns at Batasi'. Perhaps his most striking work from this mid-'60s period lies in the unsettling b&w atmosphere of Losey and Harold Pinter's 'The Servant', whose gradually more expressionistic images convey the perverse shifting power balance between "master" [James Fox] and scheming "gentleman's gentleman" [Dirk Bogarde].

Slocombe was often attracted to projects that invited multiple visual approaches. For Huston's sadly studio-truncated drama 'Freud', he deployed "at least four different techniques within the film, all in b&w, to separate the flashbacks, the biographical story, dream sequences and so forth." George Cukor's 'Travels with My Aunt' as well as Zinnemann's 'Julia' similarly conjured wholly different looks for its contemporary scenes and romanticized memory segments.

"I always took everything in my stride... I'd always find a solution for any problem," Slocombe says. Still, he confesses, "In all the films I did, the ones I enjoyed most were always those that were literary subjects - not necessarily coming from a book, but with a script that one could listen to." He cites the "brilliant and funny" black comedy 'Kind Hearts and Coronets' as a personal favorite, along with 'The Great Gatsby' and the much laurelled 'Julia'. Given that preference, it did not at first seem a natural fit when Spielberg asked the cinematographer to shoot the epic 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'. Though very intrigued, Slocombe was somewhat taken aback by Spielberg's favoring "a very, very tight schedule, enormous numbers of setups every day, very large sets that he didn't want laboriously lit. It was challenging in terms of keeping on schedule - or rather ahead of schedule, as was his wont." Nonetheless, he soon grew to consider this collaboration among his most enjoyable, one that carried on through two sequels. [From article by Dennis Harvey in 'Variety', 2002.]

 

With dir Steven Spielberg [right]

 

Douglas Slocombe's career remains indelibly associated with his work at Ealing Studios and especially with its most radical and enduringly relevant films. It is impossible to think of 'Kind Hearts and Coronets', or 'The Man in the White Suit', or 'Mandy' aside from their particular look, the precision and integrity of their black-and-white cinematography, the "real blacks and pure whites" that Slocombe mentions in interview, the subtlety of their shading, all are as much part of their meaning as the performances or direction.

His career falls into three periods: Ealing; a free-lance period dominated by work with Losey, Huston, Mackendrick and Polanski, through the sixties and early seventies; and a final period of work with Steven Spielberg.

Slocombe's early experiences as a news cameraman thrust into the action during the early years of the war in Europe with nothing more than a camera and an instinct for catching the essence of an event, have remained seminal to his mode of work, his enjoyment of cinema and his scepticism concerning received wisdom. It was Cavalcanti, Ealing's "creative catalyst," who invited him to join the studio, after his war footage had been used in several documentaries. He started work, without any formal training, as cinematographer. Knowing from his newsreel experience how to shoot in natural light, he now had to learn, on his feet, how to simulate that effect. Ealing remains for him a memory of passionate debate and fervent exploration. With Mackendrick, Hamer and Crichton he found directors who in their different ways were similarly working "on the edge" and to an extent against the grain. It is typical that he should solve the technical problem of Alec Guinness's multiple characters in 'Kind Hearts and Coronets' in the camera itself, a solution that demanded absolute preclusion [the camera was nailed to the floor and no one but Slocombe was permitted to rewind the film]. Likewise, never having seen anyone shoot a night scene in the studio, he had to improvise from observation and early experience as a photographer.

With 'Saraband for Dead Lovers', his first color film, he was determined to bring to it the same scale of contrast as he had used with black-and-white film, rather than follow the rules for shooting with Technicolor, a decision not welcomed at the time. The final effect was romantic and expressive, and despite the film's lack of success, he looks back with affection on the technical complexity of the Technicolor process and relishes the fact that printing from Technicolor negatives remains pure and accurate despite the passage of time. On 'Cage of Gold' he began working with Chic Waterson, who remained his operator for some twenty-five years.

Both 'The Servant', a dark look at class and power in sixties Britain, and John Huston's 'Freud', offered him opportunities to continue and develop explorations in black-and-white cinematography which he had begun at Ealing. Losey required a new intricacy of camera movement and atmospheric lighting, while Huston required the creation of five very different visual styles to signal, narrative, flashback, dream, nightmare and memory. On both films Slocombe exploited negative overexposure in order to emphasize contrast.

Nothing could be further from the claustrophobia of Losey's 'The Servant' than the expansive world of the Indiana Jones films. After shooting the India footage on Spielberg's earlier 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind', Slocombe was rehired for 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' and moved from films which might require some 300 setups to ones which could involve some 2,000.

Slocombe's long career has not been free from duds, but in common with the very greatest cinematographers, his best work derives its integrity and precision from its absolute faithfulness to the particular nature of the project in hand, and to the basic physical interaction of camera, light and film. [From article by Verina Glaessner on the filmreference.com website.]

 

#2: [Left]

 

Spending an afternoon with Douglas Slocombe has its Homeric aspects. A botched course of laser treatment has robbed him of the use of his right eye - the one with which he gazed through camera viewfinders - and the vision in his left eye has been deteriorating since being injured in a jeep crash during a location recce. "Until this happened I never worried about that," he says, brightly. "So long as you've got one good eye, the other one is just back-up." To optimize what remains of his sight, we sit near the window of his airy Kensington flat, as he narrates the story of his life.

His father, George Slocombe, was a celebrated Paris correspondent who interviewed Hitler and Mussolini, and was instrumental in securing Gandhi's release from jail. Douglas was raised in France, but returned to England in 1933, where - after a stint writing a column on Parisian life from the London offices of British Universal Press - he began working as a freelance photojournalist. A series of pictures shot in Gdansk/Danzig in 1938 altered the course of his career. The American documentary-maker Herbert Kline asked him to return to the city with a movie camera, and Slocombe's life through a lens began. "It was my baptism of fire," he says, "in terms of film and war."

He took shots of Goebbels addressing a rally, and escaped from an aggressive auditorium of Brownshirts by scurrying under their outstretched arms as they Sieg Heiled. He filmed the burning of a synagogue, for which he was imprisoned in a Gestapo cell. He was in Warsaw when hostilities began. He attempted to escape from Poland by rail, but the train was attacked from the air. After weeks traveling across the war-torn countryside, he reached the Latvian border and returned to London via Stockholm.

Slocombe's war was spent filming documentary material for the Ministry of Information, with his salary paid by Ealing Studios, on condition that they could also make use of his footage. It was the beginning of a 17-year association with Ealing Studio.

The velocity and variety of his career is difficult to convey. I'll give you the details of a movie that proved the most satisfying and frustrating film of his career. Satisfying because it contained what, in his own estimation, was his best work; frustrating because most of it was destroyed by the company for which it was shot.

The story of the production begins with a meeting between John Huston and Jean-Paul Sartre in the director's castle in Galway. Sartre was persuaded to supply the script. When the first draft came in, Huston, the producer Wolfgang Reinhardt, and Slocombe were shocked to receive a document which, in Slocombe's words, "looked liked four telephone directories, running into several thousand pages." Sartre declined to rewrite it, and dissociated himself from the project, whereupon Reinhardt and Huston set upon the script with their scissors. Pre-production began in Munich, during which time Slocombe experimented to find ways of giving different visual textures to the four narrative modes of the movie. "And then," he recalls, "we came across a stumbling block. And that was poor old Monty Clift."

In 1957, while filming 'Raintree County', Clift had smashed his car into a tree, disfiguring the left side of his face. He was also suffering from cataracts, and mixing his alcohol with barbiturates and amphetamines. "The part was as long as that of Hamlet," remembers Slocombe, "but the boy couldn't remember anything, not a line. He asked John whether we could shoot scenes around him, leaving his speeches until later. And John played ball, so we did that. And then the time came to shoot his material. I would light the set for nine o'clock in the morning, and when Monty came in at a quarter past nine, he would say he wasn't quite ready. He would just lie on the floor on his tummy, and, like a child trying to learn his history, he'd look at his script and silently mouth the words."

After lunch, Clift would be ready to attempt a scene. "Sometimes he could remember the first word, but then he'd need to be prompted. After a time getting nowhere, I suggested to John that we try idiot boards. We devised the shots so we could put these little things behind the back of a chair, or on somebody's back, or behind a vase on the mantelpiece. But then we found that wouldn't work because he couldn't remember where they were. It was absolute agony."

The shoot over-ran by several months. Universal responded to the increased costs by attempting to sue Clift, and the legal action made him virtually unemployable. However, at a screening for studio executives, Huston announced that the film was exactly as he wanted it to be seen in cinemas. "I remember," says Slocombe, "the Universal chaps sitting next me saying under their breath: that's what he thinks." They sliced it down by 90 minutes, and released it as 'Freud: The Secret Passion', "in case," notes Slocombe, "people thought it was the name of a frozen food."

Douglas Slocombe's view of the world may now be vague and indistinct, but he has bequeathed his vision to us. And his blindness has brought new, unlooked-for insights. With the living room now in darkness, he tells me how he recently obtained an unabridged recording of 'Ulysses'. As a child he listened, bemused, to these words from Joyce's own lips; even as a grown man, he found the text hard work. Today, however, he sits there entranced. [From article by Matthew Sweet in 'The Independent', March 15, 2002.]

 

1999

 

Last week [8 December 2009] leading figures in British and American cinema turned out to take part in a BAFTA tribute to the great cinematographer, Douglas Slocombe, 97 this coming February.

At the age of 10, he met James Joyce in Paris when the novelist dropped around with a pre-publication copy of 'Ulysses' for Dougie's bohemian parents, and his career ranges from covering the German invasion of Poland in 1939 as a combat cameraman [he is on his way home via Stockholm with his previous footage] to shooting three 'Indiana Jones' movies on exacting locations in the 1980s. From the early war years, Dougie was a leading photographer at Ealing, working in a variety of modes, from the macabre 'Dead of Night' through the ultra-realist 'It Always Rains on Sunday' to the iconic comedies 'Hue and Cry', 'Kind Hearts and Coronets' and 'The Lavender Hill Mob'.

After Ealing he shot the Cliff Richard musical 'The Young Ones', John Huston's 'Freud: The Secret Passion' and Joseph Losey's 'The Servant', collaborating intimately with the directors in determining their individual styles, confirming his reputation for imagination, visual flair and dramatic composition, as well as becoming celebrated for his wit, modesty, generosity and calming influence on the set. A film of his appears in almost everyone's 10 Best lists.

Stories about him abounded. In his tribute, Harrison Ford claimed that Dougie never used a light meter - he just held up his hand and observed the shadow his thumb made on the palm. Vanessa Redgrave spoke of the wonderful way Dougie shot her father as a mad ventriloquist in 'Dead of Night', and the flattering way he lit her and Jane Fonda in Fred Zinnemann's 'Julia'. Glenda Jackson recalled an overhead shot in which Dougie photographed her stark naked on the floor of a rocking Russian train in Ken Russell's 'The Music Lovers'. When, after a brutal third take, he dropped on top of her from the luggage rack, he said, in his charming stammer: "I'm a m-married m-man."

At the end, Slocombe, owner of one of the great eyes in movie history but now nearly blind, thanked BAFTA for honoring him and the NHS for making his appearance there possible. [Philip French in 'The Observer', 11 December 2009.]


 

 FILMS

1939

The Big Blockade [Charles Frend] b&w; reporter ph; ph: Wilkie Cooper; originally intended as a Ministry of Information 2-reeler

1940

Lights Out in Europe [Herbert Kline] b&w; doc/42m; addph; ph: Alexander Hammid

1941

Guests of Honour [Ray Pott] b&w; doc/23m

1941

Find, Fix and Strike [Compton Bennett] b&w; doc/37m; cph: Roy Kellino; a Royal Navy information film on the Fleet Air Arm training; prod by Ealing Studios

1941

Ships with Wings [Sergei Nolbandov] b&w; uncred ?; int ph: Wilkie Cooper & Mutz Greenbaum; ext ph: Eric Cross & Roy Kellino

1942

The Foreman Went to France/Somewhere in France [Charles Frend] b&w; co-2uc; ph: Wilkie Cooper

1942

Greek Testament/The Shrine of Victory [Charles Hasse] b&w; doc/45m

 

 

1942

Went the Day Well?/48 Hours [(Alberto) Cavalcanti] b&w; reporter cameraman; ph: Wilkie Cooper

1943

Undercover/Underground Guerrillas [Sergei Nolbandov] b&w; 2uc; ph: Wilkie Cooper

1943

San Demetrio London [Charles Frend & (finished film) Robert Hamer] b&w; uncred ?; ph (cred as camera): Ernest Palmer

1944

For Those in Peril/Air Sea Rescue [Charles Crichton] b&w; ext ph; int ph: Ernest Palmer

1944

Painted Boats/The Girl of the Canal [Charles Crichton] b&w; dram doc/63m

 

 

1945

Dead of Night [Basil Dearden (seg #1 & #6), Alberto Cavalcanti (seg #2 & #4), Robert Hamer (seg #3) & Charles Crichton (seg #5)] b&w; 5 seg + linking story (seg #6); cph: Stan Pavey; Slocombe and Pavey cred as 'lighting'

1945

The Captive Heart [Basil Dearden] b&w; 2uc: Lionel Banes

1946

Hue and Cry [Charles Crichton] b&w

1947

The Loves of Joanna Godden [Charles Frend & (uncred) Robert Hamer] b&w; 2uc: Leslie Rowson

1947

It Always Rains on Sunday [Robert Hamer] b&w

 

With Jill Balcon and Joan Greenwood - "Saraband for Dead Lovers"

Photo Thys Ockersen Archive

 

1948

Saraband for Dead Lovers/Saraband [Basil Dearden] c

1948

Another Shore [Charles Crichton] b&w

1949

Whisky Galore!/Tight Little Island [Alexander Mackendrick] b&w; cph: Gerald Gibbs & Jo Jago; 2uc: Harry Gillam

1949

Kind Hearts and Coronets [Robert Hamer] b&w

1949

A Run for Your Money [Charles Frend] b&w

1950

Dance Hall [Charles Crichton] b&w; addph: Lionel Banes

1950

Cage of Gold [Basil Dearden] b&w

 

[Left] with Audrey Hepburn and Alec Guinness

"The Lavender Hill Mob"

 

1951

The Lavender Hill Mob [Charles Crichton] b&w; addph: Geoffrey Faithfull

1951

The Man in the White Suit [Alexander Mackendrick] b&w; addph: Lionel Banes

1951

His Excellency [Robert Hamer] b&w

1952

Mandy/The Story of Mandy/Crash of Silence [Alexander Mackendrick] b&w; 2uc: Paul Beeson

1952

The Titfield Thunderbolt [Charles Crichton] c; 2uc: Paul Beeson

1953

The Love Lottery [Charles Crichton] c

1954

Ludwig II [ Helmut Käutner] c

1954

Lease of Life [Charles Frend] c; 2uc: Paul Beeson

1955

The Red Carpet: Diary of a Journey [prod: Peter Brook] ?; doc/30m; the Peter Brook/Paul Scofield production of 'Hamlet' in Moscow

1955

Sailor Beware!/Panic in the Parlor [Gordon Parry] b&w

1955

Touch and Go/The Light Touch [Michael Truman] c

1956

The Man in the Sky/Test Pilot/Decision Against Time [Charles Crichton] b&w

1956

The Smallest Show on Earth/Big Time Operators [Basil Dearden] b&w

1956

Barnacle Bill/All at Sea [Charles Frend] b&w; radar ph: John Stewart

1957

Davy [Michael Relph] tr/c

1958

Tread Softly, Stranger [Gordon Parry] b&w

1959

Circus of Horrors/Phantom of the Circus [Sidney Hayers] c

1960

The Boy Who Stole a Million [Charles Crichton] b&w

1960

Taste of Fear/Scream of Fear [Seth Holt] b&w; uwph: John Jordan & Egil S. Woxholt

1961

The Mark [Guy Green] cs/b&w

1961

The Young Ones/Wonderful to Be Young! [Sidney J. Furie] cs/c

1962

The L-Shaped Room [Bryan Forbes] b&w

1962

Freud [: The Secret Passion] [John Huston] b&w

 

[Left] with dir Joseph Losey - "The Servant"

 

1963

The Servant [Joseph Losey] b&w

1963

The Third Secret [Charles Crichton] cs/b&w

 

 

1964

Guns at Batasi [John Guillermin] cs/b&w

1964

A High Wind in Jamaica [Alexander Mackendrick] cs/c; 2uc: Cecil Cooney

1965

Promise Her Anything [Arthur Hiller] c

1965

The Blue Max [John Guillermin] cs/c; 2uc: Skeets Kelly (+ aph) & Donald C. Rogers

1966

Dance of the Vampires/The Fearless Vampire Killers [Roman Polanski] p/c

1966

Fathom [Leslie H. Martinson] fs/c; ph parachute seq: Jacques Dubourg

1967

Robbery [Peter Yates] c

1967

Boom [Joseph Losey] p/c

 

[Left] with dir Anthony Harvey [right] - "The Lion in Winter"

 

1968

The Lion in Winter [Anthony Harvey] p/c

1969

The Italian Job [Peter Collinson] p/c; 2uc: Norman Warwick

1969

The Buttercup Chain [Robert Ellis Miller] p/c

1970

The Music Lovers/The Lonely Heart [Ken Russell] p/c

1970

Murphy's War [Peter Yates] p/c; aph: Robin Browne

1970

The Devils/The Devils of Loudon [Ken Russell] was asked to be the ph, but declined the offer; film was ph by David Watkin

1972

Travels with My Aunt [George Cukor] p/c

1972

Jesus Christ Superstar [Norman Jewison] tao35 (+ 70bu)/c

1973

The Great Gatsby [Jack Clayton] p/c; 2uc: Richard E. Brooks

1973

The Return [Sture Rydman] c; short/30m

1974

The Marseille Contract/The Destructors [Robert Parrish] c

 

[Left] with dir Christopher Miles and c.op Chic Waterson

"The Maids"

 

1974

The Maids [Christopher Miles] c; 'I wanted to work again with David Watkin who had launched his Oscar winning career with my film 'The Six-Sided Triangle' but after telling (actress) Vivien Merchant who was lighting she replied... "Well, Christopher, I have to tell you its either Watkin or me". David took it well when I told him, fearing he might have let her stand under a 20K light too long when he lit Pinter's 'The Homecoming' the year before - I then chose Douglas Slocombe, whose excellent work I knew right from my student days with 'Kind Hearts and Coronets', but the Completion Guarantors turned him down saying he was too slow. So I went to see Douggie, who lived near me, and we discussed the problems of shooting a feature in 12 days. We both decided on one camera; a very flat studio floor to track on, using wheels, not rails as was then the norm. He had a slight stutter, so when I rang back the Guarantors who asked me what Douggie had thought, I told them he said that he would "F-f-fucking show them!"... and he did, we completed the film in an impossible 12 day schedule, with an extra day in Paris.' (Christopher Miles)

1974

Rollerball [Norman Jewison] c; 2uc: Robin Browne

 

Dir Christopher Miles - asst dir Nigel Wooll - c.op Chic Waterson - D. Slocombe

"That Lucky Touch"

 

1974

That Lucky Touch [Christopher Miles] c

1975

The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones [Cliff Owen] c

1975

The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea [Lewis John Carlino] p/c

1975

Hedda [Trevor Nunn] c

1976

Nasty Habits/The Abbess [Michael Lindsay-Hogg] c; 2uc: Dan Lerner

1976

Julia [Fred Zinnemann] c; 2uc: Paddy Carey & Guy Delattre

1977

Close Encounters of the Third Kind [Steven Spielberg] p/c; ph India seq; ph: Vilmos Zsigmond & (add USA scenes) William Fraker

1977

Caravans [James Fargo] p/c; 2uc: Gordon Meagher

1978

Lost and Found [Melvin Frank] c; 2uc: Matt Tundo

1978

The Lady Vanishes [Anthony Page] p/c; 2uc: John Harris

1979

Nijinsky [Herbert Ross] c

 

[Center/with glasses] - "Raiders of the Lost Ark"

 

1980

Raiders of the Lost Ark [Steven Spielberg] p/c; addph: Paul Beeson; principal ph July-October 1980 (73 days)

1981

The Pirates of Penzance [Wilford Leach] p/c; addph: Paul Beeson

1982

Never Say Never Again [Irvin Kershner] p/c; 2uc: Paul Beeson; aph: Peter Allwork; uwph: Bob Steadman

1983

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom [Steven Spielberg] p/c; 2uc: Allen Daviau; addph: Paul Beeson & Rick Fichter; aph: Jack Cooperman; vfx ph: Michael McAlister & Michael Owens

1985

Water [: The Movie] [Dick Clement] c; 2uc: Bob Smith

1985

Lady Jane [Trevor Nunn] c

1988

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade [Steven Spielberg] p/c; addph: Paul Beeson & Robert Stevens (USA); 2uc: Rex Metz (USA); aph: Peter Allwork

 

 TELEVISION

1956

Heaven and Earth [Peter Brook] tvm

1974

Love Among the Ruins [George Cukor] tvm

 

 FILMS AS CAMERA OPERATOR

1944

Champagne Charlie [Alberto Cavalcanti] ph: Wilkie Cooper