GREAT CINEMATOGRAPHERS


#2: "From This Day Forward" [1945]

#3: With his wife Joan Blondell

 

   


GEORGE BARNES

 

Born: 16 October 1892, Pasadena, Calif., USA, as George Scott Barnes.

Died: 30 May 1953, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.

Career: Having started as a still ph for Thomas H. Ince in 1917, Barnes quickly rose through the ranks to director of photography. In the course of his career he spent time at just about every major studio in Hollywood: Paramount [1919-21], Metro [1924-25], United Artists [1926-31], MGM [1932], Warner Brothers [1933-38], 20th Century-Fox [1940-41], Universal [1942] and RKO [1942-48].

Was a member of the ASC.

Was married [1933-36] to actress Joan Blondell, and was the father of television executive Norman Scott [Barnes] Powell, who was adopted by his mother's second husband, Dick Powell, in February 1938.

Awards [selection]: 'Oscar' AA nom [1927-28] for 'The Devil Dancer', 'The Magic Flame' & 'Sadie Thompson'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1928-29] for 'Our Dancing Daughters'; 'Oscar' AA [1940; b&w] for 'Rebecca'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1945; b&w] for 'Spellbound' & [color] for 'The Spanish Main'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1950; color] for 'Samson and Delilah'.



After more or less routine work for Warners' musicals of the 30's, George Barnes' career gradually became more and more interesting. From his monochrome films two stand out: 'Jane Eyre' and 'Force of Evil', where he created the same dark and brooding atmosphere, which he also probably strived for on his best RKO films, but never quite achieved. Still, apart from Nicholas Musuraca, nobody at RKO was quite as good at making an ordinary set look good or at least interesting with various lighting and shadow effects. [Markku Salmi in 'Film Dope', No. 2, March 1973.]


An artist of great versatility, George S. Barnes was one of the masters of Hollywood cinematography, his handsome, stylish work best served in visually lush melodramas like 'Rebecca', 'Jane Eyre', and 'Frenchman's Creek'. Barnes excelled in many genres - musicals, westerns, or science-fiction - but could also create a darker, more realistic visualization for social drama and film noir.

In the silent era, Barnes's finest achievements included 'Janice Meredith', a Revolutionary War drama in the Griffith style; the Valentino vehicle 'The Son of the Sheik', with its softly lit interiors and exhilarating desert photography of Arab horsemen; and 'The Winning of Barbara Worth', highlighted by a climactic and still impressive flood sequence.

Barnes became Samuel Goldwyn's number one cameraman in 1925 with 'The Dark Angel', and his exquisite visuals became a Goldwyn hallmark in the late 1920s and early 1930s. He was responsible for the studio's important romantic team Ronald Colman and Vilma Banky, both in their solo vehicles and their tandem efforts. Barnes's assistant and eventual co-photographer on the Goldwyn films was Gregg Toland, who learned cinematography under Barnes's tutelage. Toland's later work on 'Dead End', 'Wuthering Heights', and 'Citizen Kane' shows Barnes's influence in the refinement of deep focus, expressive camera movement, and faultless lighting.

'Bulldog Drummond' exemplifies their artistry together. The film is an early precursor to the James Bond pictures, and allows for a bravura photographic style. Imaginative tracking shots are coupled with William Cameron Menzies's eccentric sets to create a visual feast. Tremendously mobile for one of the first talking pictures, 'Bulldog Drummond' is set almost entirely at night, and Barnes and Toland eschew day-for-night for actual nocturnal exteriors.

Toland succeeded Barnes as Goldwyn's ace cameraman, and Barnes moved on to brief stints at MGM and Fox before settling at Warners. He brought a gritty, realistic look to message movies like 'Massacre', 'Black Legion', and 'Marked Woman', but usually was assigned to musicals. He shot a trio of Busby Berkeley classics and many lesser musicals. Barnes left Warners in 1938 for more rewarding films, and found himself very much in demand.

Henry King's 'Jesse James' was a tremendous change from the sound-stage musicals, a lavish western adventure filmed in dazzling three-strip Technicolor. Barnes imparts a staggering sense of movement to the proceedings, his exteriors bringing life to the vigorous action. Barnes also did the sequel in Technicolor, 'The Return of Frank James', this time with Fritz Lang directing. The color was just as vibrant, but Lang gave darker meaning to the film, reflected in Barnes's claustrophobic interiors.

Barnes's 1940s work is impeccable. He won an 'Oscar' for Alfred Hitchcock's 'Rebecca', a black-and-white masterpiece. Manderley, the manor house of Daphne du Maurier's novel, was given a brooding, foreboding quality by Barnes's play of light and shadow. He also photographed 'Spellbound' for Hitchcock, famed for the surrealistic Salvador Dali-designed dream sequence, a flashy, disproportionate, bizarre experiment.

Barnes furnished a darker view than was normal for Frank Capra's films. In 'Meet John Doe', he painted the images in starkly defined high contrast, then softened the focus for the climactic rooftop scene in the snow. His later Capras and the Bing Crosby musicals were by necessity much lighter in tone and text. Barnes's films for Leo McCarey during this period were slick studio jobs with a director noted for his straightforward, uncomplicated camera style. Barnes's main challenge in the McCarey films was to give the Hollywood glamour treatment to the stars.

Barnes also distinguished himself with outstanding color work.  In his epics for Cecil B. DeMille, the Biblical 'Samson and Delilah', and the circus marathon 'The Greatest Show on Earth', Barnes employed garish colors for the director's showy vision.

A consummate cinematographer, George Barnes had a prolific career exemplified by a high degree of lighting sophistication, an intuitive mastery of deep-focus photography, and a creative sense of composition and camera movement. He helped set the Hollywood standard for studio cinematography, yet could also transcend the limitations of the system and paint artistically lasting works of cinema. [From article by John A. Gallagher on the www.filmreference.com website.]


 

 FILMS [1 reel = c. 10m]

1918

Keys of the Righteous [Jerome Storm] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Charles J. Stumar; prod Thomas H. Ince Productions, Inc. (THIP)

1918

Naughty, Naughty! [Jerome Storm] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: John S. Stumar; prod Thomas H. Ince Corporation (THIC)

1918

The Biggest Show on Earth [Jerome Storm] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Charles J. Stumar; prod THIC

1918

Desert Wooing [Jerome Storm] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Edwin Willat; prod THIC

1918

The Vamp [Jerome Storm] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: John S. Stumar; prod THIC

1918

The Marriage Ring [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: John S. Stumar; prod THIC 

1918

Vive la France!/The Cross of Shame [R(oy) William Neill] b&w; 5 reels; cph: John S. Stumar; prod THIC

1918

When Do We Eat? [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Robert Newhard; prod THIC

1918

Fuss and Feathers [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Robert Newhard; prod THIC

1918

Dangerous Hours [Fred Niblo] b&w; 7 reels; prod THIC

1919

Happy Though Married [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; ?; ph: Robert Newhard; prod THIC

1919

Partners Three [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1919

The Law of Men/Nemesis [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1919

The Haunted Bedroom [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1919

The Virtuous Thief [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1919

Stepping Out [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIP

1919

What Every Woman Learns [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1919

The Woman in the Suitcase [Fred Niblo] b&w; 6 reels; prod THIP

1920

Sex/Sex Crushed to Earth/Expiation/The Spider Woman [Fred Niblo] b&w; 7 reels; ?; ph Charles J. Stumar; prod J. Parker Read, Jr. Productions

1920

The False Road [Fred Niblo] b&w; 6 reels; prod THIC

1920

Hairpins [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1920

Her Husband's Friend [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIC

1920

Silk Hosiery [Fred Niblo] b&w; 5 reels; prod THIP

1921

The Beautiful Gambler [William Worthington] b&w; 5 reels; prod Universal Film Manufacturing Company (UFMC)

1921

The Heart Line [Frederick A. Thom(p)son] b&w; 6 reels; prod Leah Baird Productions

1921

The Bronze Bell [James W. Horne] b&w; 6 reels; prod THIC

1921

Opened Shutters [William Worthington] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1922

Woman, Wake Up! [Marcus Harrison] b&w; 6 reels; prod Florence Vidor Productions (FVP)

1922

The Real Adventure [King Vidor] b&w; 5 reels; prod Cameo Pictures/FVP

1922

Dusk to Dawn [King Vidor] b&w; 6 reels; prod FVP

1922

Conquering the Woman [King Vidor] b&w; 6 reels; prod King W. Vidor Productions

1922

Peg o' My Heart [King Vidor] b&w; 8 reels; prod Metro Pictures Corporation (MPC)

1923

Alice Adams/Foolish Daughters [Rowland V. Lee] b&w; 6 reels; prod Encore Pictures

1923

The Love Piker [E. Mason Hopper] b&w; 7 reels; prod Cosmopolitan Productions (CP)

1923

Desire [Rowland V. Lee] b&w; 7 reels; prod MPC

1924

Yolanda [Robert G. Vignola] b&w; 11 reels; cph: Ira H. Morgan; prod CP

1924

Janice Meredith/The Beautiful Rebel [E. Mason Hopper] b&w; 11 reels; cph: Ira H. Morgan; prod CP

1925

Zander the Great [George Hill] b&w; 8 reels; cph: Harold Wenstrom; prod Cosmopolitan Pictures

1925

The Teaser [William A. Seiter] b&w; 7 reels; prod Universal-Jewel (Universal Pictures Corporation)

1925

The Dark Angel [George Fitzmaurice] b&w; 8 reels; prod Samuel Goldwyn Productions, Inc.

 

#1: [Right] with dir Clarence Brown - "The Eagle"

#2: [Top] with Rudolph Valentino [left] and Clarence Brown + daughter

 

1925

The Eagle [Clarence Brown] b&w; 7 reels; uncred cph: Devereaux Jennings; prod Art Finance Corporation

1926

Mademoiselle Modiste [Robert Z. Leonard] b&w; 7 reels; prod Corinne Griffith Productions

1926

The Son of the Sheik [George Fitzmaurice] b&w; 7 reels; the last film of Rudolph Valentino; prod Feature Productions

 

 

1926

The Winning of Barbara Worth [Henry King] b&w; 9 reels; cph: Thomas Brannigan (as Thomas E. Branigan); tech efx: Ned Herbert Mann; prod Samuel Goldwyn, Inc. (SGI)

1926

The Night of Love [George Fitzmaurice] b&w; 8 reels; cph: Thomas Brannigan; prod SGI

1927

Venus of Venice [Marshall Neilan] b&w; 7 reels; prod Constance Talmadge Productions

1927

The Magic Flame [Henry King] b&w; 9 reels; prod SGI

1927

The Devil Dancer [Fred Niblo (finished film); (uncred) Alfred Raboch (started film) & Lynn Shores (replaced Raboch)] b&w; 8 reels; cph: Thomas Brannigan; prod SGI

1927

Sadie Thompson [Raoul Walsh] b&w; 9 reels; cph: Oliver Marsh & Robert Kurrle; restored in 1987 (with mus score); prod Gloria Swanson Productions, Inc.

1928

Two Lovers [Fred Niblo] b&w; 9 reels; silent & sound (mus score + sound efx) versions; prod SGI

1928

Our Dancing Daughters [Harry Beaumont] b&w; 9 reels; silent & sound (mus score + sound efx) versions; prod CP

1928

The Awakening [Victor Fleming] b&w; 9 reels; silent & sound (mus score + sound efx) versions; prod SGI

1928

The Rescue [Herbert Brenon] b&w; 9 reels; cph: Joseph F. Biroc & James Wong Howe; silent & sound (mus score + sound efx) versions; prod SGI

1929

This Is Heaven [Alfred Santell] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1929

Bulldog Drummond [F. Richard Jones & (assoc dir) A. Leslie Pearce] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1929

The Trespasser [Edmund Goulding] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1929

Condemned/Condemned to Devil's Island [Wesley Ruggles] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1930

Raffles [George Fitzmaurice (replaced Harry d'Arrast who was fired] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1930

What a Widow! [Allan Dwan] b&w

1930

A Lady's Morals/The Soul Kiss/Jenny Lind [Sidney Franklin] b&w

1930

One Heavenly Night [George Fitzmaurice] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1930

The Devil to Pay! [George Fitzmaurice (replaced Irving Cummings after a few days)] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland

1931

Five and Ten/Daughter of Luxury [(uncred) Robert Z. Leonard] b&w

1931

The Unholy Garden [George Fitzmaurice] b&w; uncred cph: Gregg Toland; a 'Hollywood Reporter' news item noted that the photography was uneven throughout the film and speculated that the retakes were done by a photographer other than George Barnes, who received onscreen credit; Gregg Toland is credited as co-photographer, and it is possible that he shot the additional scenes [From the TCM website]

1931

Street Scene [King Vidor] b&w; in a modern interview, director King Vidor stated that cinematographer Gregg Toland, not George Barnes, who is credited on screen, worked with him on the production [From the TCM website]

1931

The Greeks Had a Word for Them/Three Broadway Girls [Lowell Sherman & (retakes) Harry Beaumont] b&w

 

 

1931

Polly of the Circus [Alfred Santell] b&w; 69m

1932

The Wet Parade [(uncred) Victor Fleming] b&w

1932

Society Girl [Sidney Lanfield] b&w; 67m

1932

Blondie of the Follies [Edmund Goulding] b&w

1932

Sherlock Holmes [William K. Howard] b&w; 68m

1932

Broadway Bad/Her Reputation [Sidney Lanfield] b&w; 61m

1933

Peg o' My Heart [(uncred) Robert Z. Leonard] b&w

1933

Goodbye Again [Michael Curtiz (replaced assigned dir Robert Florey)] b&w; 66m

1933

Footlight Parade [Lloyd Bacon & (mus numbers) Busby Berkeley] b&w; uncred cph: Sol Polito

1933

Havana Widows [Ray Enright] b&w; 62m

1933

Massacre [Alan Crosland] b&w; 70m

1933

Gambling Lady [Archie Mayo] b&w; 66m

1934

Smarty/Hit Me Again [Robert Florey] b&w; 65m

1934

He Was Her Man [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; 70m

 

 

1934

Dames [Ray Enright & (mus numbers) Busby Berkeley] b&w; cph: Sid Hickox & Sol Polito

1934

Kansas City Princess [William Keighley] b&w; 64m

1934

Flirtation Walk [Frank Borzage] b&w; cph: Sol Polito

1934

Gold Diggers of 1935 [Busby Berkeley] b&w; filmed 1934-35

1935

In Caliente/Viva Senorita [Lloyd Bacon & (mus numbers) Busby Berkeley] b&w; cph: Sol Polito; filmed 1934 (a few days)-35

1935

Traveling Saleslady [Ray Enright] b&w; 63m; 'Variety' notes that the film was photographed with a new type of camera developed by Warner Bros., which resulted in greater definition of players against the background and a greater depth of field

1935

Broadway Gondolier [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1935

The Irish in Us [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1935

I Live for Love/I Live for You [Busby Berkeley & (uncred retakes) William McGann] b&w; 64m

1935

Stars Over Broadway [William Keighley; (mus numbers) Busby Berkeley & Bobby Connolly] b&w

1935

The Singing Kid [William Keighley & (uncred) Busby Berkeley] b&w; filmed 1935-36

1936

Love Begins at 20/All One Night [Frank McDonald] b&w; 58m

1936

Cain and Mabel [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1936

Black Legion [Archie Mayo & (uncred) Michael Curtiz] b&w; sfx: Fred Jackman Jr. & H.F. Koenekamp

1936

Marked Woman [Lloyd Bacon & (uncred fill-in while L. Bacon was on his honeymoon) Michael Curtiz] b&w; sfx: James Gibbons & Robert Burks

1937

The Prince and the Pauper [William Keighley & (uncred fill-in while W. Keighley was ill) William Dieterle] b&w (also computer colorized version); uncred fill-in ph (while S. Polito was ill); ph: Sol Polito

1937

Ever Since Eve [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1937

Varsity Show [William Keighley] b&w; ph finale (dir by Busby Berkeley); ph: Sol Polito

1937

The Barrier [Lesley Selander] b&w

1937

The Beloved Brat/A Dangerous Age [Arthur Lubin] b&w; 62m

1937

Hollywood Hotel [Busby Berkeley] b&w; ph mus numbers; ph: Charles Rosher

1937

Love, Honor and Behave [Stanley Logan] b&w

1938

Gold Diggers in Paris/The Gay Impostors [Ray Enright] b&w; ph mus numbers (dir by Busby Berkeley); ph: Sol Polito

1938

Devil's Island [William Clemens] b&w; 62m

1938

Jesse James [Henry King & (uncred fill-in while H. King was ill) Irving Cummings] c; cph: W. Howard Greene; pfx: William Mittlestedt & Ben Southland

1939

Stanley and Livingstone [Henry King] b&w; ph Safari seq (dir by Otto Brower): Sidney Wagner; sfx: Louis J. Witte; process ph: Sol Halperin; sfx: Louis J. Witte

1939

Second Fiddle [Sidney Lanfield (replaced William A. Seiter)] b&w; uncred fill-in ph (while L. Shamroy was hospitalized); ph: Leon Shamroy

1939

Here I Am a Stranger [Roy Del Ruth & (first week) William A. Seiter] b&w; uncred cph (with dir W.A. Seiter); ph: Arthur Miller

1939

Our Neighbors - The Carters [Ralph Murphy] b&w

1939

Parole Fixer [Robert Florey] b&w; 68m; ?; ph: Harry Fischbeck

 

 

1939

Rebecca [Alfred Hitchcock] b&w; uncred 2uc: Archie Stout & Lloyd Knechtel; sfx: Jack Cosgrove; prod David O. Selznick first wanted Harry Stradling or Gregg Toland as doph

1939

Free, Blonde and 21 [Ricardo Cortez] b&w; 67m; filmed 1939-40

1940

Maryland [Henry King] c; assoc ph: Ray Rennahan

1940

The Girl from Avenue A [Otto Brower] b&w; cph: Lucien Andriot

1940

The Return of Frank James [Fritz Lang] c;  assoc ph: William V. Skall

1940

Meet John Doe [Frank Capra] b&w; sfx: Jack Cosgrove; montages: Slavko Vorkapich & (uncred) Don Siegel; add shooting in 1941

1940

Hudson's Bay [Irving Pichel] b&w; cph: J. Peverell Marley

1940

That Uncertain Feeling [Ernst Lubitsch] b&w; uncred cph: Merritt Gerstad

1941

Sex Hygiene [John Ford (dram seq) & Otto Brower (medical footage)] b&w; training film/26m; ; cph: Charles G. Clarke; prod The Signal Corps

1941

Lydia [Julien Duvivier] b&w; ?; ph (+ assoc prod): Lee Garmes

1941

Ladies in Retirement [Charles Vidor] b&w

1941

Unholy Partners [Mervyn LeRoy] b&w

1941

Remember the Day [Henry King] b&w

1941

Rings on Her Fingers [Rouben Mamoulian] b&w; filmed 1941-42

1942

Broadway [William A. Seiter] b&w

1942

Once Upon a Honeymoon [Leo McCarey] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker; montages: Douglas Travers

1942

Nightmare [Tim Whelan] b&w

1942

Mr. Lucky [H.C. Potter] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker; filmed 1942-43

 

 

1943

Jane Eyre [Robert Stevenson] b&w; spec pfx: Fred Sersen

1943

Mardi Gras [Hugh Bennett] c; mus short/19m; cph: Harry Hallenberger; ep 6-part Paramount series 'Musical Parade'

1943

Frenchman's Creek [Mitchell Leisen] c; uncred cph: Charles Lang; uncred 3uc: Karl Struss; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart; David O. Selznick did suggest Stanley Cortez as doph

1943

Since You Went Away [John Cromwell, (fill-in for 4 days) David O. Selznick; (crowd seq) Tay Garnett & (comedy seq) Eddie Cline] b&w; uncred (fired after 2 weeks); uncred cph: Stanley Cortez (replaced G. Barnes), Lee Garmes (with dir T. Garnett) & Robert Bruce; spec pfx: Jack Cosgrove & Clarence Slifer; montages: André De Toth; filmed 1943-44

1944

None But the Lonely Heart [Clifford Odets] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

 

"Spellbound"

 

1944

Spellbound [Alfred Hitchcock] tinted (few frames) & b&w; uncred 2nd cam (dream seq): Rex Wimpy; sfx: Jack Cosgrove & Clarence Slifer

1944

The Spanish Main [Frank Borzage] c; sfx: Vernon L. Walker; filmed 1944-45

1945

The Bells of St. Mary's [Leo McCarey] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1945

From This Day Forward [John Berry] b&w; vfx: Russell A. Cully; sfx: Vernon L. Walker; optical efx: Linwood Dunn

1945

Sister Kenny [Dudley Nichols] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker; optical efx: Linwood Dunn; filmed 1945-46

1946

Sinbad, the Sailor [Richard Wallace] c; sfx: Vernon L. Walker & Harold Wellman

1946

The Emperor Waltz [Billy Wilder; (fill-in for a few days) Doane Harrison] c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1947

Mourning Becomes Electra [Dudley Nichols] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker & Russell A. Cully

1947

Good Sam [Leo McCarey] b&w; sfx: Russell A. Cully; add shooting in January 1948

1948

The Boy with Green Hair [Joseph Losey] c

1948

No Minor Vices [Lewis Milestone] b&w

 

 

1948

Force of Evil [Abraham Polonsky] b&w

1948

Samson and Delilah [Cecil B. DeMille] c; Holy Land ph (shot in North Africa): Dewey Wrigley; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings (dir), Paul K. Lerpae & Devereaux Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart & Wallace Kelley; filmed 1948-49; see Gordon Jennings

1949

The File on Thelma Jordon [Robert Siodmak] b&w; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1949

Riding High [Frank Capra] b&w; cph: Ernest Laszlo; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1949

Let's Dance [Norman Z. McLeod] c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1949

Mr. Music [Richard Haydn] b&w; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1950

Something to Live For [George Stevens] b&w; process ph: Farciot Edouart & Wallace Kelley

1950

Here Comes the Groom [Frank Capra] b&w; sfx: Gordon Jennings & Paul Lerpae; process ph: Farciot Edouart; filmed 1950-51

1951

The Greatest Show on Earth [Cecil B. DeMille] c; addph: J. Peverell Marley & Wallace Kelley; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings, Paul K. Lerpae & Devereaux Jennings

1951

Somebody Loves Me [Irving Brecher] c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings

1951

Just for You [Elliott Nugent] c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings & Paul Lerpae; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1952

The War of the Worlds [Byron Haskin] b&w-c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings, Wallace Kelley, Paul Lerpae, Jan Domela, a.o.; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1952

Road to Bali/The Road to Hollywood [Hal Walker] c; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings & Paul K. Lerpae; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1952

Little Boy Lost [George Seaton] b&w; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart & Loyal Griggs

 

 MISCELLANEOUS

1917

Flare-Up Sal [Roy William Neill] co-c.asst; ph: John S. Stumar; prod Thomas H. Ince Corporation (THIC)